NORFOLK STATE UNIVERSITY
700 PARK AVENUE * NORFOLK, VIRGINIA * 23504
Robinson Technology Center (RTC)
Office:: (757) 823-9454     Fax: (757) 823-9229
Email: CompSci@nsu.edu

Computer Science Courses

DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE SYLLABUS

COURSE NUMBER & TITLE:
ITE-195   Introduction to Internet Programming (formerly CSC-195)
COURSE CREDITS:
3
PREREQUISITES:
None
CO-REQUISITES:
None
COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This is a computer programming course concentrating on HTTP and Web-based application development. Starting with brief overview of web page design, HTML, Plug-ins and ActiveX controls embedding, XML and CSS, followed by introduction of various commonly used Internet programming languages. Learning (reviewing) and using JAVA programming language for web-enabling and savvy web/network application development will then be the main focus of the course.

COURSE MATERIALS / REQUIRED TEXT(s) / SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS:
  • Just Enough Web Programming with XHTML™, PHP®, and MySQL®; Guy W. Lecky-Thompson; Course Technology PTR. Web ISBN 978-1-59863-684-0

  • References
  • Java Web Development Illuminated by Qian, Allen, Gan and Brown; Jones and Bartlett Publishers ISBN 978-0-7637-3423-7
  • HTML, XHTML, and XML by Patrick Carey; Cengage Learning
  • Sun Java APIs - http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.4.2/docs/api/index.html

Purchase books/supplies Online at NSU Barnes & Nobles Bookstore (http://norfolkstate.bncollege.com)

COMPUTER SCIENCE OFFICE LOCATION:

The Department of Computer Science is located in Suite 320 Robinson Technology Center. The individual faculty offices are located within the suite.

COURSE RATIONALE:

This course is a required course for the BS.ITE Information Technology program. It is designed to cover the introductory core body of knowledge in Internet Programming with Java as specified in the Association of Computing Machinery (ACM) recommendation for baccalaureate Information Technology curriculum (October 2005). It is the role of the IT professional to select, design, deploy, integrate, and administer web server and its applications. This course provides an overview of web programming.

COURSE GOALS & INTENDED OUTCOMES

    Main Objective
    The major goal of the course is:
  • To give a comprehensive introduction to Internet application programming.

  • Measureable Objectives:
    By the end of the course, students will be able to:
  • Lnderstand various language choices for Internet application programming.
  • Analyze and define specifications of an Internet application
  • Design, develop and build useful Internet applications with at least one of the Internet application programming languages.

COURSE OUTLINE

  • Overview of Hypertext Markup Language, block and text elements, frame and cascading style sheets CSS.
  • Java Script, PHP
  • OP, basic JAVA syntax
  • Applets and basic graphics
  • Handling mouse and keyboard events, layout manager, AWT, SWING

PRIMARY METHOD(S) OF INSTRUCTION / METHODS TO ENGAGE STUDENTS

The primary method of instruction will be lectures by the instructor with examples, demonstrations and hands-on laboratories. Students will also participate in class and group discussions.

GRADING STANDARDS

A
B+
B
C+
C
D+
D
F
90 - 100
87 - 89
80 - 86
77 - 79
70 - 76
67 - 69
60 - 66
0 - 59

Evaluation
The total points system will be used in this course. There will be a total of 10-14 laboratory assignments, a midterm examination and a final examination. Each assignment, as well as the exams will be assigned a maximum of possible points. These maximum possible points vary on each assignment depending on the difficulties of the assignments. Each examination will worth 100 points. The students’ grades are given according to the total percentage earned.

Lectures: Outlines of lectures will be made available on the Blackboard document pages.
Working Together: I expect that every student will abide by the Ethics Policies of the department. These policies can be found on the departmental web site. Essentially, they prohibit working together except to ask questions about the meaning of a statement (error, assignment requirement, and so forth). There may be assignments where you are REQUIRED to work together. In these cases the prohibition deals with working among and between groups and not within the group doing the assignment

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY STANDARDS

    Expectations concerning student conduct are as follows:
  • Students are encouraged to actively participate in class
  • Students should place cellular phone or pager on silent mode upon entering class
  • Any student who plagiarizes on an assignment or submits work that is not their own will receive a score of zero (0) for that assignment. This penalty will be given to all students involved and I reserve the right to report the student(s) involved to Student Affairs for disciplinary action.
  • Students are expected to abide by the ACM code of Ethics. http://www.acm.org/about/code-of-ethics

COURSE POLICIES

Due Dates
Assignments are due at the end of class on the due date. Assignments not turned by the end of class will be considered late and will be accepted at the discretion of the instructor.

Student athletes/musicians/ those representing the University at events
Schedules of planned absences by the University must be given to your Instructor in advance of any scheduled departures.
If you will be representing the University, on the date an assignment is due then you must complete and submit all work before your departure. Missed assignments cannot be turned in upon your return.

Incompletes
Students will not be given an incomplete grade in the course without sound reason and documented evidence as described in the Student Handbook. In any case, for a student to receive an incomplete, he or she must be passing and must have completed a significant portion of the course.

    Cell Phones & Other Electronic Devices
  • Students should place phones on silent mode upon entering class.
  • Class time is not the time to actively engage in texting.
  • Cell phones must be put in the bag at all times during the class session.
  • No Electronic Devices (earphones) should be used in the class time.

SCHOOL-WIDE TUTORING SERVICES STATEMENT

The college of Science, Engineering, and Technology provides tutoring services through the STARS Tutoring Center for those NSU student who may be experiencing difficulties in Mathematics, Computer Science, Engineering, Biology, Chemistry, Nursing, Technology and Physics courses. The STARS office is located in Suite 100, RTC. This service is free of charge and provided to NSU students only. You can access information about this service by going to http://stars.nsu.edu.

AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) STATEMENT

In accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, we ask if you have a disability or think you have a disability, please contact O.A.S.I.S., the Office of Accessibility Services, upon registration at Norfolk State University to confidentially discuss any accommodation needs.

    Audrey M. Wells, Coordinator, O.A.S.I.S.
    Office of Accessibility Services and International Student Services
    Norfolk State University, 700 Park Ave., Student Services Center, Suite 110, Norfolk, VA. 23504
    Phone: 757-823-8325, Fax: 757-823-2640, Email: amwells@nsu.edu

UNIVERSITY ASSESSMENT STATEMENT

As part of NSU's commitment to provide the environment and resources needed for success, students may be required to participate in a number of university-wide assessment activities. The activities may include tests, surveys, focus groups and interviews, and portfolio reviews. The primary purpose of the assessment activities is to determine the extent to which the university's programs and services maintain a high level of quality and meet the needs of students. Students will not be identified in the analysis of results. Unless indicated otherwise by the instructor, results from University assessment activities will not be computed in student grades.

WRITING COMPETENCY ASSESSMENT

All first-time freshmen and readmitted students entering Fall 2001 and thereafter and transfer students entering Fall 2002 and thereafter are required to take an exit examination to assess writing competency. After completing ENG 102, students must register for ENG 299 (no credit, no charge) until successfully passing the Examination of Writing Competency. Degree-seeking students at the baccalaureate level are required to take the writing examination before completing 90 semester hours. Associate degree-seeking students must take the exam no later than one semester prior to the anticipated date of graduation. For more information, refer tot he NSU Undergraduate catalog.

UNIVERSITY WIDE & COURSE-SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS

    Information Technology Literacy
  • Learning foundation skills (hardware, software, and operating systems).

    Critical Thinking
  • Solving problems utilizing application software from a narrative description.
  • Knowing the appropriate software application to apply to a specific task.

    Laboratory
  • Demonstrating proficiency in utilizing software applications.
CLASS ATTENDANCE POLICY

A student is expected to attend all classes. The student assumes all responsibility for work missed due to an absence. Make-up work may be permitted at the discretion of the instructor. Refer to the NSU Student Handbook (https://www.nsu.edu/Assets/websites/student-affairs/student-handbook/NSU-Student-Handbook.pdf)

NSU EMAIL ACCOUNT

In an effort to keep student informed about Norfolk State University updates and account information, students must check their official NSU email account frequently. You may access your official NSU email account through the MyNSU portal at https://www.nsu.edu/mynsu/index. Once there, follow instructions provided to login to the MyNSU portal (NOTE: you access your NSU email from within the MyNSU portal).

DISCLAIMER: The instructor reserves the right to revise the syllabus as appropriate and will make reasonable attempts to notify students.